sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 
 

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

 

(via writtendark)

itmovesmemorelol:

42 Flowers You Can Eat 
by Melissa Breyer   Living / Green Food
The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greek and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking — think of squash blossoms in Italian food and rose petals in Indian food. Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbacious, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising.
It’s not uncommon to see flower petals used in salads, teas, and as garnish for desserts, but they inspire creative uses as well — roll spicy ones (like chive blossoms) into handmade pasta dough, incorporate floral ones into homemade ice cream, pickle flower buds (like nasturtium) to make ersatz capers, use them to make a floral simple syrup for use in lemonade or cocktails. I once stuffed gladiolus following a recipe for stuffed squash blossoms — they were great. So many possibilities…
Eating Flowers Safely
So. As lovely as eating flowers can be, it can also be a little … deadly! Not to scare you off or anything. Follow these tips for eating flowers safely:
Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.
Allium to Violets
1. Allium All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful! Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible.
2. AngelicaDepending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor.3. Anise hyssopBoth flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor.4. ArugulaBlossoms are small with dark centers and with a peppery flavor much like the leaves. They range in color from white to yellow with dark purple streaks.5. Bachelor’s buttonGrassy in flavor, the petals are edible. Avoid the bitter calyx.6. BasilBlossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder.7. Bee balmThe red flowers have a minty flavor.8. BorageBlossoms are a lovely blue hue and taste like cucumber!9. Calendula / marigoldA great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds dash to any dish.10. Carnations / dianthusPetals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.11. ChamomileSmall and daisylike, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.12. ChervilDelicate blossoms and flavor, which is anise-tinged.13. ChicoryMildly bitter earthiness of chicory is evident in the petals and buds, which can be pickled.14. ChrysanthemumA little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals.15. CilantroLike the leaves, people either love the blossoms or hate them. The flowers share the grassy flavor of the herb. Use them fresh as they lose their charm when heated.16. Citrus (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, kumquat)Citrus blossoms are sweet and highly scented. Use frugally or they will over-perfume a dish.17. CloverFlowers are sweet with a hint of licorice.18. DandelionRead more about dandelions here: Backyard Forage for Dandelions.19. DillYellow dill flowers taste much like the herb’s leaves.20. English daisyThese aren’t the best-tasting petals — they are somewhat bitter — but they look great!21. FennelYellow fennel flowers are eye candy with a subtle licorice flavor, much like the herb itself.22. FuchsiaTangy fuchsia flowers make a beautiful garnish.23. GladiolusWho knew? Although gladioli are bland, they can be stuffed, or their petals removed for an interesting salad garnish.24. HibiscusFamously used in hibiscus tea, the vibrant cranberry flavor is tart and can be used sparingly.25. HollyhockBland and vegetal in flavor, hollyhock blossoms make a showy, edible garnish.26. ImpatiensFlowers don’t have much flavor — best as a pretty garnish or for candying.27. JasmineThese super-fragrant blooms are used in tea; you can also use them in sweet dishes, but sparingly.28. Johnny Jump-UpAdorable and delicious, the flowers have a subtle mint flavor great for salads, pastas, fruit dishes and drinks.29. LavenderSweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes.30. Lemon berbenaThe diminutive off-white blossoms are redolent of lemon — and great for teas and desserts.31. LilacThe blooms are pungent, but the floral citrusy aroma translates to its flavor as well.32. MintThe flowers are — surprise! — minty. Their intensity varies among varieties.33. NasturtiumOne of the most popular edible flowers, nasturtium blossoms are brilliantly colored with a sweet, floral flavor bursting with a spicy pepper finish. When the flowers go to seed, the seed pod is a marvel of sweet and spicy. You can stuff flowers, add leaves to salads, pickle buds like capers, and garnish to your heart’s content.34. OreganoThe flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf.35. PansyThe petals are somewhat nondescript, but if you eat the whole flower you get more taste.36. RadishVarying in color, radish flowers have a distinctive, peppery bite.37. RoseRemove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties.38. RosemaryFlowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary.39. SageBlossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves.40. Squash and pumpkinBlossoms from both are wonderful vehicles for stuffing, each having a slight squash flavor. Remove stamens before using.41. SunflowerPetals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke.42. VioletsAnother famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks.From True Food: Eight Simple Steps to a Healthier You (National Geographic, 2009) by Annie B. Bond, Melissa Breyer and Wendy Gordon.
/|\
☽✪☾ The Dance at Alder Cove - Youth/Father/Geezer  -  I see you
 

//

itmovesmemorelol:

42 Flowers You Can Eat

by Melissa Breyer   Living / Green Food

The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greek and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking — think of squash blossoms in Italian food and rose petals in Indian food. Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbacious, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising.

It’s not uncommon to see flower petals used in salads, teas, and as garnish for desserts, but they inspire creative uses as well — roll spicy ones (like chive blossoms) into handmade pasta dough, incorporate floral ones into homemade ice cream, pickle flower buds (like nasturtium) to make ersatz capers, use them to make a floral simple syrup for use in lemonade or cocktails. I once stuffed gladiolus following a recipe for stuffed squash blossoms — they were great. So many possibilities…

Eating Flowers Safely

So. As lovely as eating flowers can be, it can also be a little … deadly! Not to scare you off or anything. Follow these tips for eating flowers safely:

  • Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
  • Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  • Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  • Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  • If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  • To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.

Allium to Violets

1. Allium
All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful! Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible.

2. Angelica
Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor.

3. Anise hyssop
Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor.

4. Arugula
Blossoms are small with dark centers and with a peppery flavor much like the leaves. They range in color from white to yellow with dark purple streaks.

5. Bachelor’s button
Grassy in flavor, the petals are edible. Avoid the bitter calyx.

6. Basil
Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder.

7. Bee balm
The red flowers have a minty flavor.

8. Borage
Blossoms are a lovely blue hue and taste like cucumber!

9. Calendula / marigold
A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds dash to any dish.

10. Carnations / dianthus
Petals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.11. Chamomile
Small and daisylike, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.

12. Chervil
Delicate blossoms and flavor, which is anise-tinged.

13. Chicory
Mildly bitter earthiness of chicory is evident in the petals and buds, which can be pickled.

14. Chrysanthemum
A little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals.

15. Cilantro
Like the leaves, people either love the blossoms or hate them. The flowers share the grassy flavor of the herb. Use them fresh as they lose their charm when heated.

16. Citrus (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, kumquat)
Citrus blossoms are sweet and highly scented. Use frugally or they will over-perfume a dish.

17. Clover
Flowers are sweet with a hint of licorice.

18. Dandelion
Read more about dandelions here: Backyard Forage for Dandelions.

19. Dill
Yellow dill flowers taste much like the herb’s leaves.

20. English daisy
These aren’t the best-tasting petals — they are somewhat bitter — but they look great!

21. Fennel
Yellow fennel flowers are eye candy with a subtle licorice flavor, much like the herb itself.

22. Fuchsia
Tangy fuchsia flowers make a beautiful garnish.

23. Gladiolus
Who knew? Although gladioli are bland, they can be stuffed, or their petals removed for an interesting salad garnish.

24. Hibiscus
Famously used in hibiscus tea, the vibrant cranberry flavor is tart and can be used sparingly.

25. Hollyhock
Bland and vegetal in flavor, hollyhock blossoms make a showy, edible garnish.

26. Impatiens
Flowers don’t have much flavor — best as a pretty garnish or for candying.

27. Jasmine
These super-fragrant blooms are used in tea; you can also use them in sweet dishes, but sparingly.

28. Johnny Jump-Up
Adorable and delicious, the flowers have a subtle mint flavor great for salads, pastas, fruit dishes and drinks.

29. Lavender
Sweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes.

30. Lemon berbena
The diminutive off-white blossoms are redolent of lemon — and great for teas and desserts.

31. Lilac
The blooms are pungent, but the floral citrusy aroma translates to its flavor as well.

32. Mint
The flowers are — surprise! — minty. Their intensity varies among varieties.

33. Nasturtium
One of the most popular edible flowers, nasturtium blossoms are brilliantly colored with a sweet, floral flavor bursting with a spicy pepper finish. When the flowers go to seed, the seed pod is a marvel of sweet and spicy. You can stuff flowers, add leaves to salads, pickle buds like capers, and garnish to your heart’s content.

34. Oregano
The flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf.

35. Pansy
The petals are somewhat nondescript, but if you eat the whole flower you get more taste.

36. Radish
Varying in color, radish flowers have a distinctive, peppery bite.

37. Rose
Remove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties.

38. Rosemary
Flowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary.

39. Sage
Blossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves.

40. Squash and pumpkin
Blossoms from both are wonderful vehicles for stuffing, each having a slight squash flavor. Remove stamens before using.

41. Sunflower
Petals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke.

42. Violets
Another famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks.

From True Food: Eight Simple Steps to a Healthier You (National Geographic, 2009) by Annie B. Bond, Melissa Breyer and Wendy Gordon.

/|\

☽✪☾
The Dance at Alder Cove -
Youth/Father/Geezer  I see you

 

(via beemill)

socialismartnature:

Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.
That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

socialismartnature:

Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.

That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

(Source: twitter.com, via face-down-asgard-up)

rebellingintherustbelt:

socialismartnature:


BREAKING: The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department is suspending its water shutoffs for 15 days. We will keep up the pressure until they stop the shutoffs permanently!   Statement from the Detroit Water Brigade: http://bit.ly/1sFfDgghttp://on.freep.com/1tqmaZO 

===

Without struggle, there is no progress


This is really important, but I can’t emphasize enough to tradtional AND social media—this is NOT. OVER. At a recent community meeting, the water dept said: 

In a community meeting with the Rosedale Park residents July 17, DWSD representatives told residents there would not be a moratorium on foreclosures. DWSD sub-contractor Charlie Fleetham also told residents there would not be an implementation of an affordability plan because it was against the law.

What that means is that people can still lose their homes AND that any type of affordability plan is *ILLEGAL*. do you understand that? *JUSTICE IS ILLEGAL*.
This also means that when the 15 days are up? If there already was a holy reign of media terror against the people who can’t pay their bills, it will be even WORSE after the 15 days and people still can’t afford to pay their bills. Who can solve poverty in 15 days? I know I can’t. But there will be *relentless* “WE GAVE YOU EXTRA TIME, WHAT IS UR PROBLEM??????” narrative spewing and an even more aggressive call to shut off than what there already is.
Folks in the media MUST stay vigilant!

rebellingintherustbelt:

socialismartnature:

BREAKING: The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department is suspending its water shutoffs for 15 days. We will keep up the pressure until they stop the shutoffs permanently!

Statement from the Detroit Water Brigade: http://bit.ly/1sFfDgg
http://on.freep.com/
1tqmaZO

===

Without struggle, there is no progress

This is really important, but I can’t emphasize enough to tradtional AND social media—this is NOT. OVER. At a recent community meeting, the water dept said: 

In a community meeting with the Rosedale Park residents July 17, DWSD representatives told residents there would not be a moratorium on foreclosures. DWSD sub-contractor Charlie Fleetham also told residents there would not be an implementation of an affordability plan because it was against the law.

What that means is that people can still lose their homes AND that any type of affordability plan is *ILLEGAL*. do you understand that? *JUSTICE IS ILLEGAL*.

This also means that when the 15 days are up? If there already was a holy reign of media terror against the people who can’t pay their bills, it will be even WORSE after the 15 days and people still can’t afford to pay their bills. Who can solve poverty in 15 days? I know I can’t. But there will be *relentless* “WE GAVE YOU EXTRA TIME, WHAT IS UR PROBLEM??????” narrative spewing and an even more aggressive call to shut off than what there already is.

Folks in the media MUST stay vigilant!

"And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard."
- "Why Don’t the Unemployed Get Off Their Couches?" and Eight Other Critical Questions for Americans (via seriouslyamerica)

(via takeherbacktowonderland)

lellyphant:

ail-contraire:

anagnori:

The reason you should avoid using offensive language isn’t because it might offend people. It’s because those words are consistently, reliably harmful to others. Words can silence, intimidate, isolate, and even kill people.

The things you say do not exist in a vacuum. You might not be able to see the pain people feel when they hear you talk like that, or feel widespread systems of violence and dehumanization being reinforced, but it’s there. Something that seems funny or harmless to you could contribute to another person feeling unsafe and broken.

It’s not that you should care about offending people. It’s that you should care about people.

#if you think it’s funny to deliberately say things to make others upset then you are probably a terrible person

and by “probably” i mean “definitely”

(via transyoite)